Karen Pelland

Karen Pelland

Independent Producer

Karen Pelland is a freelance radio journalist who occasionally dabbles in documentary film. Prior to getting her start at WBUR public radio in Boston in 1999, however, she wandered the grey cubicles of corporate America, not quite sure what it was all about. After moving to New York in 2002, her work ranged from freelance radio gigs to non-profit consulting, documentary film production and book research. Lots of dog sitting, too. In addition to Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead, her other documentary projects include Morgan Spurlock’s What Would Jesus Buy? and Where in the World is Osama Bin Laden? When she’s not road tripping around the country, Karen currently lives in Santa Barbara, California, freelancing around town, as well as for NPR and other public radio outlets.

Karen Pelland on KCRW

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering why it’s getting harder and harder to afford local California lobster, look no further than the exploding middle class in China. Its demand for…

Shelling out for California lobster

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering why it’s getting harder and harder to afford local California lobster, look no further than the exploding middle class in China. Its demand for…

from News Stories

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