Karen Pollitz

Kaiser Health Foundation

Guest

Karen Pollitz is a senior fellow at the Kaiser Health Foundation. She previously worked on the Affordable Care Act at the Department of Health and Human Services.

Karen Pollitz on KCRW

Three weeks ago, the House passed its Obamacare replacement without any public hearings and before the Congressional Budget Office determined what it would do and what it would cost.

Sunlight or secrecy: Which would you choose?

Three weeks ago, the House passed its Obamacare replacement without any public hearings and before the Congressional Budget Office determined what it would do and what it would cost.

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