Katie Davis

Katie Davis

Independent Producer

Katie Davis is a longtime public radio broadcaster and producer. Katie worked for NPR for more than a decade in various jobs including field producer, reporter and host. She went on to produce an independent series for NPR’s All Things Considered called Neighborhood Stories, which became the inspiration of a book she is writing.


Katie Davis on KCRW

Being an African-American fighting in the jungles of Vietnam meant always getting the most dangerous missions, and sometimes having to save the lives of the very people who hated you.

Bloods

Being an African-American fighting in the jungles of Vietnam meant always getting the most dangerous missions, and sometimes having to save the lives of the very people who hated you.

from UnFictional

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