Kenneth Feinberg

Author

Guest

Former administrator of the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund and other programs as well as author of “Who Gets What: Fair Compensation After Tragedy and Financial Upheavel.”

Kenneth Feinberg on KCRW

It’s been 14 years since the attack on the World Trade Center. Lower Manhattan has slowly come back to life.

The Ongoing 9/11 Lawsuits

It’s been 14 years since the attack on the World Trade Center. Lower Manhattan has slowly come back to life.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Victims of the attacks of September 11th were compensated with public money. Victioms of the Oklahoma bombing were not. How come? Is there a single, appropriate policy?

Who Gets What in Public Tragedies

Victims of the attacks of September 11th were compensated with public money. Victioms of the Oklahoma bombing were not. How come? Is there a single, appropriate policy?

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Students are cutting class, and workers are striking worldwide.   At the UN, governments will be held accountable for promises made in the Paris Accords.

from To the Point

Where would America be without the muckraking journalists and the publications that champion their work?

from Scheer Intelligence

In 1950, America had the richest middle class in the world, but now U.S. workers face wage stagnation and historic wealth inequality.

from To the Point

Politicians normally go to Hollywood for money. Should Hollywood help them tell better stories instead?

from Left, Right & Center

President Trump wonders in a tweet who is worse: Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell, or Chairman Xi Jinping.

from Left, Right & Center

Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas and battered the Carolinas, but what dominated the news cycle?

from Left, Right & Center

Author and University of Michigan professor Alexandra Minna Stern traces the origins of America's burgeoning white nationalist movement.

from Scheer Intelligence

What did President Trump do this time?

from Left, Right & Center

Jet aircraft, carrier task forces and tanks consume vast amounts of fossil fuel--while emitting vast amounts of greenhouse gases. The Pentagon’s carbon footprint is bigger than those of many entire nations. Now, it’s caught in the middle. It’s a massive contributor to climate change, which is threatening its mission worldwide. Seaports and airstrips are being flooded or burned out, and restoring operations costs many millions of dollars. Meantime, environmental damage is leading to instability and the prospect of international violence. Water shortages have increased tensions in the Middle East and caused new hostilities between India and Pakistan, two nuclear powers. Russia and China are taking advantage of changing conditions. Will politicians who scorn environmentalists and mistrust climate scientists listen to the warnings of military leaders?

from To the Point