Linda Krop

Environmental Defense Center

Guest

Chief Counsel at the Environmental Defense Center in Santa Barbara, California

Linda Krop on KCRW

Hundreds of protesters gathered at the state capitol building in Sacramento yesterday, to speak out against the Trump Administration’s plan to expand oil and gas drilling in federal…

Public meeting on offshore oil expansion draws angry coastal activists

Hundreds of protesters gathered at the state capitol building in Sacramento yesterday, to speak out against the Trump Administration’s plan to expand oil and gas drilling in federal…

from The 805

Jonathan Bastian leads a lively discussion with local environmental and oil experts on major issues like criminal and civil liability, wildlife restoration, pipeline regulation and the…

The Refugio Oil Spill, One Year Later

Jonathan Bastian leads a lively discussion with local environmental and oil experts on major issues like criminal and civil liability, wildlife restoration, pipeline regulation and the…

from News Special Programming

Citing the spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Governor Schwarzenegger has cancelled what’s called the  Tranquillon Ridge Plan , which would have allowed new drilling from a rig offshore from…

Governor Drops Support for Off-shore Drilling

Citing the spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Governor Schwarzenegger has cancelled what’s called the Tranquillon Ridge Plan , which would have allowed new drilling from a rig offshore from…

from Which Way, L.A.?

More from KCRW

Hope Refuge helps underage sex trafficking survivors transition to a new life of freedom.

from The 805

Scientists hope to reduce whale fatalities from ship collisions.

from The 805

Nearly 200 years ago, the Cherokee Nation signed a treaty with the United States. The result? They were forcibly removed from the Southeastern part of the U.S. to Oklahoma.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Last week's mass shooting in El Paso has been particularly painful for Angelenos, because so many have close ties to that city.

from Greater LA

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point

The mysterious arrest of a Swedish data privacy activist with links to the WikiLeaks founder raises important questions about government surveillance.

from Scheer Intelligence

The Trump administration tried to bury a report showing that it's water use plans for California would decimate a unique species of salmon.

from KCRW Features

Jet aircraft, carrier task forces and tanks consume vast amounts of fossil fuel--while emitting vast amounts of greenhouse gases. The Pentagon’s carbon footprint is bigger than those of many entire nations. Now, it’s caught in the middle. It’s a massive contributor to climate change, which is threatening its mission worldwide. Seaports and airstrips are being flooded or burned out, and restoring operations costs many millions of dollars. Meantime, environmental damage is leading to instability and the prospect of international violence. Water shortages have increased tensions in the Middle East and caused new hostilities between India and Pakistan, two nuclear powers. Russia and China are taking advantage of changing conditions. Will politicians who scorn environmentalists and mistrust climate scientists listen to the warnings of military leaders?

from To the Point

Author and University of Michigan professor Alexandra Minna Stern traces the origins of America's burgeoning white nationalist movement.

from Scheer Intelligence