Lulu Miller

Host, Invisibilia

Lulu Miller is an NPR Science Desk Reporter where she covers human (and occasionally insect) behavior — and is co-host of NPR's Invisibilia.

Miller covers stories that challenge our assumptions about how organisms work — from the story of a blind woman who can see the rain but not her daughter's smile, to a virus that inspires crickets to have more sex. She is always on the hunt for "stories in which Duct-Tape Solves the Ethereal Sadness," as she puts it.

Miller joins NPR Science Correspondent Alix Spiegel to co-host Invisibilia, a new series from NPR about the unseen forces that control human behavior – our ideas, beliefs, assumptions, and thoughts. Invisibilia interweaves personal stories and fascinating new psychological and brain science in a way that, ultimately, makes you see your own life differently. The radio program also will be available on podcast and excerpts will be featured on All Things Considered and Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR in 2013, Miller taught and wrote fiction at the University of Virginia on a Poe-Faulkner Fellowship. Before that, she was with Radiolab, working as one of the founding producers on the weekly public radio show and podcast that weaves stories and science into sound and music-rich documentaries. Radiolab is produced by WNYC and distributed by NPR. Miller produced Radiolab for five years and continues to serve as a contributor. Her work has been recognized by the George Foster Peabody Awards, Third Coast, and The Missouri Review.

Miller graduated from Swarthmore College with a degree in History.

Lulu Miller on KCRW

When you take on the trappings of something – just step into a role – can it change you more deeply, from the Outside In?

Outside In

When you take on the trappings of something – just step into a role – can it change you more deeply, from the Outside In?

from Invisibilia

Usually when someone is hostile to us, we are hostile right back. The psychological term is "complementarity."

Flip the Script

Usually when someone is hostile to us, we are hostile right back. The psychological term is "complementarity."

from Invisibilia

Are you rich? Well married? Successful? You may think the answer has to do with your objective situation.

Frame of Reference

Are you rich? Well married? Successful? You may think the answer has to do with your objective situation.

from Invisibilia

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