Lynn Shelton

Lynn Shelton

Writer, director

Guest

Writer, director

Lynn Shelton on KCRW

In Lynn Shelton’s new movie ‘Sword of Trust,’ Marc Maron plays Mel, a cranky, down-on-his-luck pawn shop owner in Alabama.

Marc Maron and Lynn Shelton on ‘Sword of Trust’

In Lynn Shelton’s new movie ‘Sword of Trust,’ Marc Maron plays Mel, a cranky, down-on-his-luck pawn shop owner in Alabama.

from The Business

Lynn Shelton’s films typically have been indies featuring just a few youngish and slightly adrift men and women who talk a lot.

‘Laggies’

Lynn Shelton’s films typically have been indies featuring just a few youngish and slightly adrift men and women who talk a lot.

from The Business

Lynn Shelton: Your Sister's Sister

from The Treatment

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