Mark Thompson

New York Times

Guest

President and CEO of the New York Times and author of Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics?; former head of the BBC 

Mark Thompson on KCRW

On the eve of this year's first  debate  between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, what's the state of our political language in 2016? We talk with a man who should know.

What's gone wrong with our political language

On the eve of this year's first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, what's the state of our political language in 2016? We talk with a man who should know.

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