Mary Beth Romig

Director of Communications for the New Orleans Metropolitan Convention & Visitors Bureau

Guest

Mary Beth Romig on KCRW

Immediately after Katrina, violent crime all but disappeared from New Orleans as the city lost about half of its pre-hurricane population.

Is New Orleans Safe for Anyone?

Immediately after Katrina, violent crime all but disappeared from New Orleans as the city lost about half of its pre-hurricane population.

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