Matt Mackowiack

Potomac Strategy Group / Travis County Republican Party

Guest

Communications consultant Matt Mackowiack is president of the Potomac Strategy Group and chairman of the Travis County Republican Party in Texas. He is also host of the podcast Mack on Politics.

Matt Mackowiack on KCRW

Minnesota Senator Al Franken has now issued two apologies for kissing and groping a Los Angeles broadcaster without her consent back in 2006.

Al Franken, Roy Moore and #MeToo

Minnesota Senator Al Franken has now issued two apologies for kissing and groping a Los Angeles broadcaster without her consent back in 2006.

from One Year Later

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As people worldwide are protesting climate inaction today, we hear from a professor who incorporates “eco-grief” counseling in her classes.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

A state bill called AB 5 would require businesses that rely on independent contractors to reclassify them as employees and offer benefits such as health insurance and sick pay. There’s…

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Mattel released its latest collector’s item on Thursday: a Dia de los Muertos themed Barbie .

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Homeless deaths spiked by 76% in Los Angeles last year. This year's deaths have already outpaced that.

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The fur industry in California is worth $300 million, and fur is an important part of some people's family history. But some say the industry is cruel.

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The House Judiciary Committee will vote this week to formalize impeachment investigation procedures

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The bill sent Uber and Lyft scrambling, and it might reshape business in the entertainment industry.

from KCRW Features

The FDA sent a letter this week to Juul, saying it illegally marketed its products as safer than traditional cigarettes.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point