Matthew Rojansky

Wilson Center

Guest

Matthew Rojansky is a Russia analyst and director of the Kennan Institute at the Wilson Center. He formerly served as deputy director of the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and as executive director of the Partnership for a Secure America.

Matthew Rojansky on KCRW

It's a day of diplomacy for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Russia's Putin speaks with Trump by phone

It's a day of diplomacy for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

from To the Point

The US Navy sent a destroyer into the Black Sea this week for what it called "routine" visits to ports in Bulgaria and other countries.

Russia Threatens Retaliation over US Ship in the Black Sea

The US Navy sent a destroyer into the Black Sea this week for what it called "routine" visits to ports in Bulgaria and other countries.

from To the Point

Vladimir Putin surprised the world when he suddenly started bombing in Syria last September.

Russia's Withdrawal from Syria: Is It Real?

Vladimir Putin surprised the world when he suddenly started bombing in Syria last September.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Orange County Democrats are celebrating a victory that seemed almost impossible 10 years ago.

from KCRW Features

The race for the presidential nomination poses another stress test for the Democratic Party.

from To the Point

Jet aircraft, carrier task forces and tanks consume vast amounts of fossil fuel--while emitting vast amounts of greenhouse gases. The Pentagon’s carbon footprint is bigger than those of many entire nations. Now, it’s caught in the middle. It’s a massive contributor to climate change, which is threatening its mission worldwide. Seaports and airstrips are being flooded or burned out, and restoring operations costs many millions of dollars. Meantime, environmental damage is leading to instability and the prospect of international violence. Water shortages have increased tensions in the Middle East and caused new hostilities between India and Pakistan, two nuclear powers. Russia and China are taking advantage of changing conditions. Will politicians who scorn environmentalists and mistrust climate scientists listen to the warnings of military leaders?

from To the Point

The House Judiciary Committee will vote this week to formalize impeachment investigation procedures

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Lots of people lie to federal investigators. Very few are indicted for it.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas and battered the Carolinas, but what dominated the news cycle?

from Left, Right & Center

The communities of Gilroy, El Paso and Dayton are recovering after attackers shot and killed at least 34 people and injured dozens more.  Erroll Southers, Director of Homegrown…

from KCRW Features

Absolute immunity, executive privilege, crony privilege?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point