Max Lowe

director of the documentary “Torn,” son of the late mountain climber Alex Lowe

Max Lowe on KCRW

“When his body was discovered and our family made the decision to go back to Tibet together to recover his remains and put him to rest, it brought all that [trauma] back to the surface…

‘Torn’: Son learns to process trauma by making a film about his mountaineer dad who died in Himalayas

“When his body was discovered and our family made the decision to go back to Tibet together to recover his remains and put him to rest, it brought all that [trauma] back to the surface…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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