Melissa Block

Melissa Block

Special correspondent, 'All Things Considered'

Host/Producer

Melissa Block has been at NPR since 1985.

As one of the hosts of All Things Considered, she's thankful to be able to get out of the studio to report on a wide range of stories.

She went to the Mississippi Gulf Coast in the days just after Hurricane Katrina hit and talked to people whose lives were upended by the storm. This spring, she traveled to the Chippewa Indian reservation in Red Lake, Minnesota after the school shooting there. She profiled an Army recruiter in Texas who faces the challenges of recruiting during wartime. She prepared a series of stories on body donors and the medical students who learn from cadavers in gross anatomy class. And she immersed listeners in the powerful sounds of sacred harp singing in Alabama.

She also covered a number of stories leading up to the 2004 presidential election: the New Hampshire primary, the Democratic national convention in Boston, and the run-up to the vote in the key state of Florida.

Melissa has a long history with All Things Considered. She started with the program in 1985 as an editorial assistant. She later worked as editor, director, senior producer, and then as a correspondent based in New York.

While in New York, Block covered many high-profile news events for NPR, from police brutality and terrorism trials to the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center. Her September 11 reporting was part of coverage that earned NPR News a George Foster Peabody Award.

Block also has reported from overseas for NPR News. Her 1999 report investigating rape as a weapon of war in Kosovo was cited among stories for which NPR News won an Overseas Press Club Award.

Block graduated from Harvard University in 1983 with a degree in French history and literature and spent the following year as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Geneva. She is married to Wall Street Journal reporter, author, and NPR contributor Stefan Fatsis. They have a daughter and live in Washington, DC.

Melissa Block on KCRW

Cokie Roberts died today due to complications from breast cancer. She was 75. Roberts began at NPR in the 1970s and became one of the network's most recognizable voices.

Remembering one of the mothers of NPR, Cokie Roberts

Cokie Roberts died today due to complications from breast cancer. She was 75. Roberts began at NPR in the 1970s and became one of the network's most recognizable voices.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

LA County broke another record on Wednesday, reporting more than 22,000 new coronavirus cases. Meanwhile, Moderna’s vaccine may be available as early as next week.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

One reason why COVID-19 spreads so quickly is because a lot of people who have it never show symptoms — between 20-40% of all cases.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Matt Tyrnauer, director of the devastating Showtime documentary blockbuster “The Reagans,” reveals how Donald Trump was the logical heir to the Reagan Revolution beginning with his…

from Scheer Intelligence

On Wednesday, supporters of President Trump heeded his call to go to the U.S. Capitol, where Congress was certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in the November 2020 election.

from KCRW Features

LA County continues to be the nation’s hotspot for COVID-19 cases. The county has been averaging around 16,000 new cases every day since the new year.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Josh Barro discusses Joe Biden’s picks for his advisers and cabinet heads with K.

from Left, Right & Center

In Washington D.C. today, at Donald Trump’s urging, thousands of people protested the results of the November election. A mob stormed the U.S.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LA, San Diego, and Riverside counties have run out of ICU space at their hospitals. COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths are still ballooning.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Among California’s Congressional delegation, all Democrats voted for impeachment, and all Republicans, except David Valadao, voted against impeachment.

from KCRW Features