Michelle Wilde Anderson

Author; professor of property, local government and environmental justice, Stanford Law School

A professor of property, local government and environmental justice at Stanford Law School

Michelle Wilde Anderson on KCRW

Michelle Wilde Anderson speaks to Robert Scheer about how four working class towns struggling with poverty and broke governments still managed to progress.

Saving broke and broken America, one town at a time.

Michelle Wilde Anderson speaks to Robert Scheer about how four working class towns struggling with poverty and broke governments still managed to progress.

from Scheer Intelligence

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