Moshe Marvit

Labor, Employment & Civil Rights Attorney and Author

Guest

Moshe Z. Marvit practices law in Pittsburgh, and is the coauthor, with The Century Foundation senior fellow Richard D. Kahlenberg, of Why Labor Organizing Should be a Civil Right: Rebuilding a Middle-Class Democracy by Enhancing Worker Voice (2012). He has worked at the National Labor Relations Board and was an editor at the Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal. His current research focuses on labor organizations, excluded workers, and employment and civil rights.  He received a BA in philosophy at Penn State University, an MA in political science from the University of Chicago, a JD from Chicago-Kent College of Law, and an MA in history from Carnegie Mellon University. His research on labor and employment law and policy has been published in a variety of law reviews, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The New Republic, and elsewhere.

Moshe Marvit on KCRW

With a history of support for organized labor, Wisconsin was the first state with collective bargaining for public employees.

Collective Bargaining for Public Employees

With a history of support for organized labor, Wisconsin was the first state with collective bargaining for public employees.

from Which Way, L.A.?

With a history of support for organized labor, Wisconsin was the first state with collective bargaining for public employees.  But now, after three years of upheaval, Republican…

Collective Bargaining for Public Employees

With a history of support for organized labor, Wisconsin was the first state with collective bargaining for public employees.  But now, after three years of upheaval, Republican…

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