Muzaffar Chishti

Director, Migration Policy Institute's Office at New York University School of Law

Guest

Director of the Migration Policy Institute's office at New York University School of Law

Muzaffar Chishti on KCRW

New Haven, Connecticut was first, other cities may fall in line, but the biggest so far is San Francisco.

San Francisco Will Issue ID Cards to Everyone

New Haven, Connecticut was first, other cities may fall in line, but the biggest so far is San Francisco.

from To the Point

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A last minute cease-fire in Syria; Mick Mulvaney confirms, then quickly denies a quid pro quo; and no one likes billionaires at the Democratic debate, not even the billionaire.

from Left, Right & Center

Two of the most urgent crises facing Americans---mental health and homelessness---are inextricably linked. The failure to see this has only made things worse.

from Scheer Intelligence

What did President Trump do this time?

from Left, Right & Center

“Midnight Traveler” tells the harrowing story of Afghani director Hassan Fazili and his family’s displacement as filmed on their cell phones.

from Scheer Intelligence

Presidential campaigns aren’t just on TV anymore, they’re on countless digital platforms.

from To the Point

These are some interesting texts.

from Left, Right & Center

Google says its translation service can't replace human translators, but U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services tell officers it's the most efficient tool to vet refugees.

from KCRW Features

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is speaking to reporters after meeting with the House Democratic caucus.

from News Stories