Nicholson Baker

novelist and nonfiction writer

Guest

Nicholson Baker on KCRW

Nicholson Baker's Substitute: Going to School with a Thousand Kids was born of a desire to write a book articulating his theories about education – theories based on having had kids in…

Nicholson Baker: Substitute

Nicholson Baker's Substitute: Going to School with a Thousand Kids was born of a desire to write a book articulating his theories about education – theories based on having had kids in…

from Bookworm

Nicholson Baker

from Bookworm

Nicholson Baker

from Bookworm

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