Nick Welsh

executive editor, Santa Barbara Independent

Guest

Nick Welsh is executive editor of the Santa Barbara Independent and the author of its "Angry Poodle" column.

Nick Welsh on KCRW

Santa Barbara County leads the state in marijuana growing, and the smell of skunk from all those greenhouses is overwhelming.

Is the smell of weed repelling tourists from Santa Barbara?

Santa Barbara County leads the state in marijuana growing, and the smell of skunk from all those greenhouses is overwhelming.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Santa Barbara city attorney, Ariel Calonne, talked of issuing new injunctions aimed to curb disruptive and aggressive behaviors in Santa Barbara city parks.

More services approved for homeless residents, but city parks may crackdown

Santa Barbara city attorney, Ariel Calonne, talked of issuing new injunctions aimed to curb disruptive and aggressive behaviors in Santa Barbara city parks.

from The 805

Executive editor Nick Welsh at the Santa Barbara Independent talks through some of the biggest local stories of the week, including Santa Barbara City Council’s decision to back…

This week in the 805: unions win, new oil wells debated

Executive editor Nick Welsh at the Santa Barbara Independent talks through some of the biggest local stories of the week, including Santa Barbara City Council’s decision to back…

from The 805

More from KCRW

The Annenberg Space for Photography's new exhibit, "Contact High," pays tribute to some of hip-hop’s greatest stars in all their glory and behind the scenes.

from Greater LA

Over the past three years, the minimum wage has been going up annually. As of July 1, another hike will affect employers and employees across LA.

from Greater LA

The death of the nation’s longest serving federal judge is a reminder about our lack of effective judicial oversight.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

Producer Leonardo DiCaprio and Director Leila Conners are out with a documentary called “Ice on Fire,” which focuses on people who are trying to reverse climate change, including a…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

What are the key issues for black voters in LA right now?

from Greater LA

This week, LA County Board of Supervisors approved a new sustainability plan that includes making parks and public lands more accessible, going fossil fuel-free in 25 years, and…

from Greater LA

California’s relentless clean-air enforcer, Mary Nichols, has divided the automobile industry. After weeks of secret negotiations, the Chair of the State’s Air Resources Board has announced that Ford, Honda VW and BMW of America won’t go along with President Trump’s rollback of Barack Obama’s fuel-economy standards. Nichols claims it’s an “olive branch,” giving car makers the “flexibility” to clean up the air at the same time they continue to market vehicles that make the most money. Brady Dennis of the Washington Post calls it a “big deal,” even if Toyota, GM and 11 other companies revert to Trump’s new federal standards--at least for the moment. Alan Baum is a consultant for both the industry and environmental organizations. He says the four who made the deal with California have a slight lead on their competitors in developing the technology of the future, with China currently far ahead of them all. He says the western car makers are doing a poor job of educating consumers about the benefits of hybrids and electrics. Nichols’s history with the Air Resources Board goes back to the 1970’s. She was named Chair by Republican Governor Arnold Schwartenegger and reappointed by Democrats Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom. She made an international name for herself for years ago when she blew the whistle on Volkswagen for faking emissions tests on the diesel cars it sold for decades all over the world.

from To the Point

Reports of San Francisco’s demise have been greatly exaggerated.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

Grocery workers from Albertsons, Vons, Ralphs, and Pavilions have voted to authorize a strike that could happen as soon as this weekend.

from Greater LA