Nick White

Nick White

KCRW Staff

Nick White is an award-winning radio producer and editor based in Los Angeles CA. His work has been heard on various outlets around the world including NPR, the BBC World Service, Marketplace, WBEZ, and WNYC.

He's the creator and executive producer of 'Lost Notes' - a music documentary podcast. He serves as a senior editor for several programs at KCRW including UnFictional, Here Be Monsters and The Organist. He also served as the editor for KCRW’s Independent Producer Project.

Nick spent several years as the senior producer for NPR's Bullseye with Jesse Thorn and worked closely with the Maximum Fun podcast network at that time. In 2012 Nick worked with Marc Maron to bring selections of his WTF podcast to public radio stations across the country. PRX awarded the series a Zeitfunk Award for ‘Longest Content Advisory’.

Before coming to Los Angeles, Nick spent several years in Chicago as a producer for WBEZ. He also served on the board of directors for the Chicago Independent Radio Project (CHIRP).

In 2016 Nick created, directed and produced a science fiction radio anthology called The Outer Reach. It featured performances from Martin Starr, Aparna Nancherla and Echo Kellum among others and was released on the Howl/Stitcher Premium podcast platform.

Nick’s work and collaborations have been recognized by The Los Angeles Press Club, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) and The Edward R. Murrow Awards (RTDNA) among others.

Nick White on KCRW

In 1980, anti-disco sentiment was at a high and Grace Jones was coming off a trilogy of disco albums. If she stayed stagnant, it felt like her career could be swept away.

Grace Jones

In 1980, anti-disco sentiment was at a high and Grace Jones was coming off a trilogy of disco albums. If she stayed stagnant, it felt like her career could be swept away.

from Lost Notes

Most know Minnie Riperton because of one part in one song. “Lovin’ You” was Riperton’s biggest hit, and she doesn’t sing that magic, piercing note until around the 3-minute mark.

Minnie Riperton

Most know Minnie Riperton because of one part in one song. “Lovin’ You” was Riperton’s biggest hit, and she doesn’t sing that magic, piercing note until around the 3-minute mark.

from Lost Notes

In December of 1980, two exiled artists and freedom fighters attempted return to their home in South Africa for a concert.

Hugh Masekela & Miriam Makeba

In December of 1980, two exiled artists and freedom fighters attempted return to their home in South Africa for a concert.

from Lost Notes

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