Nikolas Gvosdev

US Naval War College / The National Interest

Guest

Nikolas Gvosdev is Professor of National Security Studies at the US Naval War College and Contributing Editor at The National Interest.

Nikolas Gvosdev on KCRW

When the US was threatening force against Syria, fighting by both the government and the rebels dropped off.  Now it's increasing again.

Is US-Russian Diplomacy Prolonging Syria's Civil War?

When the US was threatening force against Syria, fighting by both the government and the rebels dropped off.  Now it's increasing again.

from To the Point

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Republican U.S. Senator Mitt Romney says President Trump’s withdrawal of soldiers protecting the Kurds violated “American honor.”

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Hill's estranged husband was shopping the "real story" behind their divorce. Then private photos and text messages showed up on conservative website.

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Fire season now lasts all year long in Southern California, and residents of Topanga Canyon have set an example for how to get ready. Volunteers are on the alert to help their neighbors, save their homes and protect their animals, or to evacuate.

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Experts worldwide are trying to tackle climate change with radical proposals, but one thinker is advocating for a more moderate approach.

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A last minute ceasefire in Syria; Mick Mulvaney confirms, then quickly denies a quid pro quo; and no one likes billionaires at the Democratic debate, not even the billionaire.

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A bone-chilling documentary about Roy Cohn, Donald Trump’s mentor, reveals the all-American evil that brought us modern-day politics.

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Gov. Gavin Newsom has approved more than 800 bills.

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A gripping documentary documents the surprising role drug cartels and illegal traffickers are playing in the looming extinction of a rare whale.

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66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point