Noah Karvelis

Arizona Educators United

Guest

Elementary school music teacher in Tolleson, Arizona, organizer for Arizona Educators United.

Noah Karvelis on KCRW

Teachers are striking for a second day in Oklahoma, where years of budget cuts have forced one in five schools to operate on a four-day week.

Teacher protests: Why now, and what's at stake?

Teachers are striking for a second day in Oklahoma, where years of budget cuts have forced one in five schools to operate on a four-day week.

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