Paul Heald

University of Illinois, College of Law

Guest

Professor at the University of Illinois’ College of Law, where he specializes in patent, copyright and intellectual property law

Paul Heald on KCRW

A survey of Amazon.com shows there are three times more books now available from the 1850’s than there are from the 1950’s. How is that possible?

Does Copyrighting Books Make Them Vanish?

A survey of Amazon.com shows there are three times more books now available from the 1850’s than there are from the 1950’s. How is that possible?

from To the Point

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The 2020 presidential race has a crowded field of competitors, and many are making their way to Los Angeles for fundraisers, rallies, and other events. KCRW is tracking LA visits by…

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Berkeley’s City Council recently adopted an ordinance to drop certain gendered terms from the city’s municipal code.

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Playboy Magazine built a culture of objectifying women that doesn't fly in the #MeToo era.

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Special Counsel Robert Mueller finally testifies before congress but did anything new come to light?

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Since March some 387 Boeing 737 Max jets have been grounded by regulators and airlines with no end in sight. Boeing profits have tanked. Last month the company recorded its biggest ever quarterly loss and deliveries are at their lowest since 2012. Boeing says it expects the plane to return to service by the end of this year, as it continues to focus on the plane’s software system, thought to be the cause of both plane crashes. Boeing’s crisis highlights a problem beyond flight safety. The aircraft manufacturer chose to prioritize big spending on CEO compensation and stock buybacks rather than reinvest profits on its employees, infrastructure and R and D. Last year alone, Boeing’s chief executive Dennis Muilenburg took home $30 in compensation and gains from options. Buybacks over investment; the financial strategy that’s great for shareholders but may well have cost Boeing the public’s trust.

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Your questions about impeachment, and more

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers