Peniel Joseph

historian and professor at the University of Texas at Austin, founder of the school’s Center for the Study of Race and Democracy

Guest

Peniel Joseph is Professor of History at University of Texas at Austin and Founding Director of its Center for the Study of Race and Democracy. He is a former professor of history at Tufts University and founding director of its Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, and a former associate professor of African and Afro-American studies at Brandeis University. Joseph is the author of Waiting 'til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America, Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama and Stokely: A Life.

Peniel Joseph on KCRW

National holidays serve as official acknowledgements of the sacrifices made by our forefathers, many of whom fought and died for the freedoms afforded by our democracy.

Recognizing Juneteenth as a national holiday honors generations of enslaved African Americans

National holidays serve as official acknowledgements of the sacrifices made by our forefathers, many of whom fought and died for the freedoms afforded by our democracy.

from Life Examined

2020 was a year when this country stared down ugly truths about systemic racism in law enforcement, health care, schools, and book publishing.

Black Lives Matter in 2021: Where the movement might go

2020 was a year when this country stared down ugly truths about systemic racism in law enforcement, health care, schools, and book publishing.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, in Minneapolis has inspired nationwide protests against injustice and police violence.

Melina Abdullah: It’s a mistake to equate what happens to property with what happens to black lives

The killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, in Minneapolis has inspired nationwide protests against injustice and police violence.

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