Peter Norton

History professor at the University of Virginia and the author of 'Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City.'

Guest

Peter Norton is a historian of technology with particular interests in streets and people. He is an associate professor in the University of Virginia's Department of Engineering and Society, where he has taught since 1998.  He is the author of 'Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City.'

Peter Norton on KCRW

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