Phil Washington

CEO of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority

CEO of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority

Phil Washington on KCRW

LA traffic is getting worse. So what is it going to take to get you out of your car and onto a bus or train?

What will it take you to give up the car?

LA traffic is getting worse. So what is it going to take to get you out of your car and onto a bus or train?

from Design and Architecture

London, Stockholm and Singapore have it. Could LA County?

Will car-loving Angelenos say yes to congestion pricing?

London, Stockholm and Singapore have it. Could LA County?

from Design and Architecture

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