Raymond Seed

Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Berkeley

Guest


Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley; head of the investigation team that looked at the levee failures during Hurricane Katrina; chair of the joint State-Federal Technical Advisory Committee for assessment of levee-related risk for the state of California

Raymond Seed on KCRW

After the Gulf States suffered a major catastrophe just one year ago today, California politicians promised action to prevent anything similar from happening here.

The Legacy of Katrina and Politics in California

After the Gulf States suffered a major catastrophe just one year ago today, California politicians promised action to prevent anything similar from happening here.

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