Rebecca Ruiz

New York Times

Guest

Investigative sports reporter for the New York Times

Rebecca Ruiz on KCRW

It's a saga that echoes the darkest intrigues of the Cold War: Dozens of Russian Olympic athletes accused of taking performance-enhancing drugs under state supervision, then faking…

Tarnished Gold: Will Russian Olympic Doping Jeopardize Rio?

It's a saga that echoes the darkest intrigues of the Cold War: Dozens of Russian Olympic athletes accused of taking performance-enhancing drugs under state supervision, then faking…

from To the Point

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Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before congress, but does he say anything new?

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The annual Iowa State Fair is known as the unofficial start to campaign season.

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Author and University of Michigan professor Alexandra Minna Stern traces the origins of America's burgeoning white nationalist movement.

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NPR's live special coverage of Robert Mueller testifying before two House committees

Since March some 387 Boeing 737 Max jets have been grounded by regulators and airlines with no end in sight. Boeing profits have tanked. Last month the company recorded its biggest ever quarterly loss and deliveries are at their lowest since 2012. Boeing says it expects the plane to return to service by the end of this year, as it continues to focus on the plane’s software system, thought to be the cause of both plane crashes. Boeing’s crisis highlights a problem beyond flight safety. The aircraft manufacturer chose to prioritize big spending on CEO compensation and stock buybacks rather than reinvest profits on its employees, infrastructure and R and D. Last year alone, Boeing’s chief executive Dennis Muilenburg took home $30 in compensation and gains from options. Buybacks over investment; the financial strategy that’s great for shareholders but may well have cost Boeing the public’s trust.

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