Robert Capecchi

Marijuana Policy Project

Guest

Robert Capecchi is Director of Federal Policies for the Marijuana Policy Project.

Robert Capecchi on KCRW

"Good people don't smoke marijuana," according to Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions. He's Donald Trump's pick for Attorney General. What will that mean for California?

The post-Trump 411 on 420

"Good people don't smoke marijuana," according to Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions. He's Donald Trump's pick for Attorney General. What will that mean for California?

from Olney in L.A.

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To tell if a dispensary is licensed or not, use your phone to scan the QR code by its front door. Also standard business hours are 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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Joe Mathews says that focusing on the state budget, when it appears in good shape, obscures California’s systemic failures.

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The former Congress member talks to Robert Scheer about his life and the dramatic events surrounding his political rise, as told in his new book “The Division of Light and Power.”

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KCRW’s Press Play asked audience members to share one habit they’ve picked up in the past year that they hope to keep.

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Since the pandemic, restaurants have taken over curbside parking for outdoor eating, and some streets have been closed to traffic. Might these changes be permanent, and what could U.S.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LA City Councilman Joe Buscaino is running to replace Mayor Eric Garcetti, and he held his first official campaign event on Monday along the Venice Beach boardwalk.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Josiah Citrin, the Michelin-starred force behind Mélisse and Citrin in Santa Monica, lost his 23-year-old son Augie to an opioid overdose in December.

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President Joe Biden signed a bill into law today declaring June 19, commonly referred to as Juneteenth , a federal holiday.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

After more than a year of the COVID-19 pandemic, in-person learning is allowed and there’s unprecedented interest for offline summer school across California, according to CalMatters.

from KCRW Features