Robert Leonard

KNIA/KRLS Radio

Guest

Robert Leonard is the news director for radio stations KNIA/KRLS in Marion County, Iowa.

Robert Leonard on KCRW

Despite the growth of cable and the dominance of three broadcast networks, many Americans still get their news from local TV.

Media competition for Fox News

Despite the growth of cable and the dominance of three broadcast networks, many Americans still get their news from local TV.

from To the Point

Despite the growth of cable and the dominance of three broadcast networks, many Americans still get their news from local TV.

Media competition for Fox News

Despite the growth of cable and the dominance of three broadcast networks, many Americans still get their news from local TV.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Since March some 387 Boeing 737 Max jets have been grounded by regulators and airlines with no end in sight. Boeing profits have tanked. Last month the company recorded its biggest ever quarterly loss and deliveries are at their lowest since 2012. Boeing says it expects the plane to return to service by the end of this year, as it continues to focus on the plane’s software system, thought to be the cause of both plane crashes. Boeing’s crisis highlights a problem beyond flight safety. The aircraft manufacturer chose to prioritize big spending on CEO compensation and stock buybacks rather than reinvest profits on its employees, infrastructure and R and D. Last year alone, Boeing’s chief executive Dennis Muilenburg took home $30 in compensation and gains from options. Buybacks over investment; the financial strategy that’s great for shareholders but may well have cost Boeing the public’s trust.

from To the Point

Three shootings in the span of one week in California, Texas, and Ohio have community members and political leaders speaking out against gun violence and hateful rhetoric toward the…

from Greater LA

A state bill called AB 5 would require businesses that rely on independent contractors to reclassify them as employees and offer benefits such as health insurance and sick pay. There’s…

from KCRW Features

And more fallout from Jeffrey Epstein’s death

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

This week, the political debate dominated political debate.

from Left, Right & Center

Once again it’s the race for the White House as Reality TV, with  20 performers focused on making the next audition. Are “bold proposals” politically risky?

from To the Point

California’s relentless clean-air enforcer, Mary Nichols, has divided the automobile industry. After weeks of secret negotiations, the Chair of the State’s Air Resources Board has announced that Ford, Honda VW and BMW of America won’t go along with President Trump’s rollback of Barack Obama’s fuel-economy standards. Nichols claims it’s an “olive branch,” giving car makers the “flexibility” to clean up the air at the same time they continue to market vehicles that make the most money. Brady Dennis of the Washington Post calls it a “big deal,” even if Toyota, GM and 11 other companies revert to Trump’s new federal standards--at least for the moment. Alan Baum is a consultant for both the industry and environmental organizations. He says the four who made the deal with California have a slight lead on their competitors in developing the technology of the future, with China currently far ahead of them all. He says the western car makers are doing a poor job of educating consumers about the benefits of hybrids and electrics. Nichols’s history with the Air Resources Board goes back to the 1970’s. She was named Chair by Republican Governor Arnold Schwartenegger and reappointed by Democrats Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom. She made an international name for herself for years ago when she blew the whistle on Volkswagen for faking emissions tests on the diesel cars it sold for decades all over the world.

from To the Point

Jet aircraft, carrier task forces and tanks consume vast amounts of fossil fuel--while emitting vast amounts of greenhouse gases. The Pentagon’s carbon footprint is bigger than those of many entire nations. Now, it’s caught in the middle. It’s a massive contributor to climate change, which is threatening its mission worldwide. Seaports and airstrips are being flooded or burned out, and restoring operations costs many millions of dollars. Meantime, environmental damage is leading to instability and the prospect of international violence. Water shortages have increased tensions in the Middle East and caused new hostilities between India and Pakistan, two nuclear powers. Russia and China are taking advantage of changing conditions. Will politicians who scorn environmentalists and mistrust climate scientists listen to the warnings of military leaders?

from To the Point

Burning Man is supposed to be a safe space. But the culture has allowed predators to roam free without punishment.

from KCRW Features