Robert O'Harrow

Washington Post

Guest

Investigative reporter for the Washington Post and author of No Place to Hide: Behind the Scenes of Our Emerging Surveillance Society.

Robert O'Harrow on KCRW

Since September 11, 2001, the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have spent big money training local police, sheriffs and state troopers to be more aggressive in searching…

Widespread Abuse of Police "Stop and Seize" Power

Since September 11, 2001, the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have spent big money training local police, sheriffs and state troopers to be more aggressive in searching…

from To the Point

Since September 11, 2001, the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have spent big money training local police, sheriffs and state troopers to be more aggressive in searching…

Widespread Abuse of Police "Stop and Seize" Power

Since September 11, 2001, the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have spent big money training local police, sheriffs and state troopers to be more aggressive in searching…

from To the Point

On his way to meeting China's new leader today, President Obama stopped in San Jose to celebrate California's implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

PRISM, How Much Big Data Is the NSA Collecting and from Whom?

On his way to meeting China's new leader today, President Obama stopped in San Jose to celebrate California's implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

from To the Point

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KCRW speaks with incumbent LA District Attorney Jackie Lacey , as well as her opponent George Gascón , who used to be district attorney in San Francisco.

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Josh Barro and Ken White talk about why some things the president says are official acts and why other things aren’t, and why that makes matters really complicated for the public and…

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President Trump denies climate change . But Joe Biden has laid out “the boldest plan of any candidate in history,” says UC Santa Barbara environmental scientist Leah Stokes.

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The presidential election is November 3. With the COVID-19 pandemic, voters might be wondering whether it’s safer to vote by mail or in person. How do mail-in ballots work anyway?

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There are millions of eligible voters in America, including 8 million in California alone.

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Commentator Joe Mathews remembers Jim Ho and Leondra Kruger as high school friends and co-editors of the school newspaper during their days at Polytechnic High School in Pasadena.

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are holding a final debate Thursday in Nashville, with Kristen Welker of NBC News moderating.

T he Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to debate and vote on the president’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The debate starts at 6 a.m. PT.

We live in a two-party system, but sometimes it takes a nudge from the margins to get things done.

from Zócalo's Connecting California