Roy Peter Clark

Poynter Institute for Media Studies

Guest

Journalist and Vice President of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, a journalism think-tank in St. Petersburg, Florida

Roy Peter Clark on KCRW

American news media are divided over whether to publish the images that infuriated Muslim extremists and apparently led to yesterday's massacre at Charlie Hebdo.

To Publish or Not to Publish: Charlie Hebdo and American Media

American news media are divided over whether to publish the images that infuriated Muslim extremists and apparently led to yesterday's massacre at Charlie Hebdo.

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