Sara Terry

The Aftermath Project

Host

A former staff correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and magazine freelance writer, Sara Terry made a mid-career transition into photojournalism and documentary photography in the late 1990's. Her first long-term project about the aftermath of war, Aftermath: Bosnia’s Long Road to Peace, was published in September 2005. Her first documentary, which was supported by the Sundance Documentary Institute, is the story of an unprecedented grass-roots program in post-conflict Sierra Leone. Fambul Tok had its world premiere at South by Southwest in March, 2011.

Sara Terry's work has been widely exhibited, at such venues as the United Nations, the Museum of Photography in Antwerp, and the Moving Walls exhibition at the Open Society Institute in New York. Her photographs are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and in many private collections. In 2005, she received a prestigious Alicia Patterson Fellowship for her work in Bosnia. She is also the founder of The Aftermath Project, a nonprofit grant program which helps photographers cover the aftermath of conflict. She is a 2012 Guggenheim fellow. Terry resides in Los Angeles and is currently working on her next long-term project, Forgiveness and Conflict: Lessons from Africa.

Sara Terry on KCRW

Twenty years ago, 8000 Bosnia Muslims were killed by Serbian forces in the city of Srebrenica. But that atrocity appears to be "only half over."

Remembering the Massacre at Srebrenica

Twenty years ago, 8000 Bosnia Muslims were killed by Serbian forces in the city of Srebrenica. But that atrocity appears to be "only half over."

from To the Point

As fighters led by ISIS move closer to Baghdad, the Iraqi government says it's deploying more troops. President Obama is weighing "selective military action."

Iraq Continues to Crumble: What Are the Options?

As fighters led by ISIS move closer to Baghdad, the Iraqi government says it's deploying more troops. President Obama is weighing "selective military action."

from To the Point

The trial of five men charged with the rape and murder of a young woman is set to start in India. What forces shape attitudes toward women in India? What needs to change?

India Confronts the Problem of Violence against Women

The trial of five men charged with the rape and murder of a young woman is set to start in India. What forces shape attitudes toward women in India? What needs to change?

from To the Point

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