Sian Beilock

Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago and author of "Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting it Right When You Have To”

Guest

Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago and author of "Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting it Right When You Have To”

Sian Beilock on KCRW

Every four years, the world focuses on Olympic athletes.

Can We Keep Getting Faster, Better, Stronger?

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