Stephen Greenblatt

Award-winning author

Guest

Literary critic and theorist Stephen Greenblatt is a professor of humanities at Harvard University and the co-founder of the literary-cultural journal Representations. He is a winner of the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for his novel The Swerve: How the World Became Modern.

Stephen Greenblatt on KCRW

Following his National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize celebrated The Swerve, in the elaborately readable The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve Stephen Greenblatt explores reasons why the…

Stephen Greenblatt: The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve

Following his National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize celebrated The Swerve, in the elaborately readable The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve Stephen Greenblatt explores reasons why the…

from Bookworm

Stephen Greenblatt: The Swerve

from Bookworm

Escaping the Cage: Identity, Multiculturalism and Writing

from Bookworm

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