Stephen Pyne

Arizona State University

Guest

Stephen Pyne is a professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University, specializing in environmental history and the history of fire. He is the author of many books on wildfires, including Tending Fire: Coping with America's Wildland FiresFire in America: A Cultural History of Wildland and Rural Fire,  Between Two Fires: A Fire History of Contemporary America and California: A Fire SurveyFrom 1967-1985 he worked as a summer firefighter in the Grand Canyon, Rocky Mountain and Yellowstone National Parks.

Stephen Pyne on KCRW

Victims of California’s fires can apply for assistance, but President Trump had a warning for the state’s residents. He wants to see a change in forest management.

Firestorms, Federal Relief and Climate Change

Victims of California’s fires can apply for assistance, but President Trump had a warning for the state’s residents. He wants to see a change in forest management.

from To the Point

Today’s blaze in Bel-Air is not the first to ravage that community. The 1961 Bel-Air fire helped cities rewrite the way they handle fires.

Lessons learned from the 1961 Bel-Air fire

Today’s blaze in Bel-Air is not the first to ravage that community. The 1961 Bel-Air fire helped cities rewrite the way they handle fires.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The blazes in Northern California are being called "firestorms," "hurricanes" and "blizzards of flame." They've been compared to a "blowtorch."

First the inferno, Now the clean-up. What then?

The blazes in Northern California are being called "firestorms," "hurricanes" and "blizzards of flame." They've been compared to a "blowtorch."

from To the Point

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California is losing its leadership position in the effort to mitigate climate change, and politics and other disasters may be to blame, according to a state lawmaker.

from To the Point

Diablo Canyon is supposed to start closing in a few years, but a Stanford-MIT report says keeping it open would help California transition to clean energy more cheaply and cleanly.

from Greater LA

Josh, Liz and Ross talk about the omicron variant, vaccine fatigue and how we can get to a normal that makes sense.

from Left, Right & Center

Competing fears about nuclear risks, climate change and power supplies are framing the discussion over the future of Diablo Canyon, says Joe Mathews.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

The Native American activist’s attorney Kevin Sharp tells Robert Scheer why Peltier’s imprisonment is one of the worst miscarriages of justice this country has ever seen.

from Scheer Intelligence

Artificial intelligence can predict breast cancer years before it shows up on a mammogram, according to a new MIT study .

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

States nationwide are seeing COVID-19 surges, and New York reported more than 60,000 new cases this past weekend, the most since the start of the pandemic.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Since Californians voted to legalize recreational marijuana five years ago, almost 20 states now allow recreational reefer, and polls show roughly two-thirds of Americans support…

from KCRW Features

The cannabis industry entered 2021 on a high note. Did that optimism hold through the year and what can we expect in 2022?

from KCRW Features