Steve Clemons

New America Foundation / The Atlantic

Guest

Steve Clemons is a senior fellow in the international security program at the New America Foundation and Washington editor-at-large at the Atlantic.

Steve Clemons on KCRW

North Korea's latest missile firing gives 20 leaders of the most powerful nations on Earth still more to talk about as they meet this week in Germany.

'America First'…and the rest of the world

North Korea's latest missile firing gives 20 leaders of the most powerful nations on Earth still more to talk about as they meet this week in Germany.

from To the Point

In deference to President Trump, NATO leaders agreed not to focus on Russia during this week's summit.

Trump declines to endorse NATO's Article 5

In deference to President Trump, NATO leaders agreed not to focus on Russia during this week's summit.

from To the Point

Trump gets intelligence briefings, and Republicans get Obamacare cold feet.

Intelligence briefings & reforming Obamacare

Trump gets intelligence briefings, and Republicans get Obamacare cold feet.

from Left, Right & Center

More from KCRW

What did President Trump do this time?

from Left, Right & Center

Students are cutting class, and workers are striking worldwide.   At the UN, governments will be held accountable for promises made in the Paris Accords.

from To the Point

President Trump is holding a press conference at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. In a speech to the U.N.

from News Stories

Malcolm Gladwell’s latest book, “Talking to Strangers,” is out, while he’s hosting the podcast, “Revisionist History.”

from To the Point

Election officials in LA County want to make voting easier, more accessible, and more secure.

from KCRW Features

Google says its translation service can't replace human translators, but U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services tell officers it's the most efficient tool to vet refugees.

from KCRW Features

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

Twelve candidates are taking the stage at 5 PM PT at the CNN/New York Times Democratic Debate, hosted at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio

from KCRW Features

Today, on All The President’s Jawyers...

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers