Steve Henn

NPR's technology correspondent.

Guest

Steve Henn is NPR's technology correspondent based in Menlo Park, California, who is currently on assignment with Planet Money. An award winning journalist, he now covers the intersection of technology and modern life - exploring how digital innovations are changing the way we interact with people we love, the institutions we depend on and the world around us. In 2012 he came frighteningly close to crashing one of the first Tesla sedans ever made. He has taken a ride in a self-driving car, and flown a drone around Stanford's campus with a legal expert on privacy and robotics.

But Steve's favorite technology stories are the ones that explain how little-understood innovations can change the way millions of us behave. Why do people buy cows in Farmville? Why are video games so compelling and why do some people have such a hard time setting Twitter aside? He is fascinated by how digital companies attempt to mold our behavior and study our every move in a world where we are constantly interacting with connected devices.

Steve Henn on KCRW

The Silk Road was an online marketplace where anonymous buyers could hook up with anonymous sellers of illegal drugs. The government shut the website down in 2013.

Silk Road Goes to Trial

The Silk Road was an online marketplace where anonymous buyers could hook up with anonymous sellers of illegal drugs. The government shut the website down in 2013.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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