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Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep

Host, Morning Edition

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with David Greene and Rachel Martin.

Traveling from African oilfields to the wreckage of New Orleans, Inskeep has interviewed the survivors of disasters both natural and man-made. He has questioned Presidential candidates, warlords, authors, and musicians. He also interviews people who otherwise would be overlooked: a steelworker, a school board member, the mother of a soldier killed in war.

Inskeep’s first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the US Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush.

After the September 11 attacks, Inskeep covered the war in Afghanistan, the hunt for al-Qaida suspects in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he was honored by the Press Club of Atlantic City with a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid that went wrong in Afghanistan. NPR received Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton awards for its overall coverage of the wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq.

In 2004, Inskeep joined a team that reshaped Morning Edition. The new program aggressively covers breaking news. It is the place to hear the stories, not the sound bites, of people in the news. He led Morning Edition teams that hosted the program from New Orleans; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for “The Price of African Oil,” a series on conflict in Nigeria.

He still enjoys the offbeat stories: rats and the people who love them; a pro wrestler recalling his career; a town in a West Virginia gorge with a population of 11.

Raised in Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a 1990 graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky, where he also worked as a radio sportscaster. Inskeep went on to work for public and commercial stations in and around New York City. His journalism has appeared in several publications, including The New York Times.

Inskeep lives in Washington, DC, with his wife Carolee, an author of several reference books on genealogy, and with their daughter Ava, who was born in 2005.


Steve Inskeep on KCRW

President Trump likes to compare himself to President Andrew Jackson, but sometimes he gets his facts wrong.

What President Trump sees in Andrew Jackson

President Trump likes to compare himself to President Andrew Jackson, but sometimes he gets his facts wrong.

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NPR's Steve Inskeep travels the country to places in which President Obama delivered speeches, and checks in with Americans living in those places to ask about their perspectives on…

Obama's Years: Part I

NPR's Steve Inskeep travels the country to places in which President Obama delivered speeches, and checks in with Americans living in those places to ask about their perspectives on…

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