Steve Lopez

columnist for the LA Times

Guest

Columnist for the Los Angeles Times and author of The Soloist

Steve Lopez on KCRW

LA Times Columnist Steve Lopez writes that Los Angeles has become “one giant trash receptacle.” The waste on the streets have fueled a growing rat infestation.

LA is turning into a giant landfill

LA Times Columnist Steve Lopez writes that Los Angeles has become “one giant trash receptacle.” The waste on the streets have fueled a growing rat infestation.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

There are about 15,000 children in L.A.’s public schools who are homeless. At Telfair Elementary in Pacoima, a quarter of students are homeless.

Why Telfair Elementary has more homeless kids than any other school in LAUSD

There are about 15,000 children in L.A.’s public schools who are homeless. At Telfair Elementary in Pacoima, a quarter of students are homeless.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

On the east side of the Colorado Street bridge in Pasadena, there’s a sign that says “There is hope,” along with a crisis hotline number.

Officials tackle suicides at Pasadena's Colorado Street bridge

On the east side of the Colorado Street bridge in Pasadena, there’s a sign that says “There is hope,” along with a crisis hotline number.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Will an all-electric Porsche drive sports car lovers to embrace clean energy vehicles? Can an adult video site help clean up plastic trash in the oceans?

from Design and Architecture

From political action to banning plastics, humans are finding ways to confront climate change.

from News Stories

The state legislature has passed Assembly Bill 1482, which would cap rent increases for many buildings across the state at 5% annually. Governor Gavin Newsom said he will sign it.

from Greater LA

The goods movement is the backbone of Southern California’s Inland Empire. With the threat of automation looming, what’s going to happen to the people getting replaced by robots?

from Greater LA

This year, Silver Lake resident Maebe A. Girl became the first drag queen elected to public office in the U.S. We look at how she got there, and how she hopes to take Rep.

from Greater LA

Electric vehicles seem to be the way of the future, especially for people who want to reduce their carbon footprint. But if you’re a renter, where are you doing most of your charging?

from Greater LA

If you're living at home with your parents, we want to hear from you. What are your top reasons for doing it? How do your parents feel about it?

from Greater LA

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

Greta Thunberg inspired Fridays for Future--school strikes around the world.  Were the leaders of major polluters paying attention? Not according to what they told the United Nations.

from To the Point