Steve Peck

President and CEO of U.S. Vets.

Guest

Peck’s involvement with veterans’ issues began more than 20 years ago, when as a filmmaker, he worked on a documentary about a group of homeless veterans living on the beach in Venice, Calif. Back then, there were few services for veterans outside of the VA, and almost none for homeless vets. Since its establishment in 1992, U.S. VETS has grown
to include 11 facilities in six states and the District of Columbia, serving more than 2,000 veterans each day; in one year they will help 3,000 veterans find housing and more than 1,000 veterans obtain full-time employment.

Steve Peck on KCRW

Los Angeles has the highest number of homeless veterans in the country and Mayor Eric Garcetti has pledged that each one will have housing by the end of the year.

New Legislation to House L.A.’s Homeless Veterans

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