Sune Engel Rasmussen

freelance journalist

Guest

Kabul-based freelance journalist who also writes for the Guardian, Foreign Policy and the Economist

Sune Engel Rasmussen on KCRW

This morning an explosion and gunfight in Kabul killed dozens and wounded more than 300 others during the morning rush hour.

Taliban Ramps Up Offensive with Kabul Bombing

This morning an explosion and gunfight in Kabul killed dozens and wounded more than 300 others during the morning rush hour.

from To the Point

American airpower is striking Taliban forces, which seized parts of the Northern Afghan city of Kunduz yesterday.

Afghan Forces Fight to Retake City after Big Loss to Taliban

American airpower is striking Taliban forces, which seized parts of the Northern Afghan city of Kunduz yesterday.

from To the Point

Mullah Omar founded and led the Taliban, which ruled Afghanistan until it was toppled by the United States after September 11, 2001.

Taliban Leader Is Dead… and Has Been for Years

Mullah Omar founded and led the Taliban, which ruled Afghanistan until it was toppled by the United States after September 11, 2001.

from To the Point

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