Theresa Cheng

emergency medicine resident at UCLA

Guest

Theresa Cheng on KCRW

Studies have shown that living near freeways can lead to all sorts of negative health outcomes, from asthma and heart attacks to pre-term births and even autism.

The health impact of living near freeways

Studies have shown that living near freeways can lead to all sorts of negative health outcomes, from asthma and heart attacks to pre-term births and even autism.

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