Tim Alberta

Politico Magazine; author of “American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump”

Guest

Chief political correspondent for Politico Magazine; author of “American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump.”

Tim Alberta on KCRW

It is often said that Donald Trump has mounted a hostile takeover of the Republican Party, that he successfully forced the party to bend to his will and vision.   
  But what if it…

How a TV celeb with no political experience remade the GOP

It is often said that Donald Trump has mounted a hostile takeover of the Republican Party, that he successfully forced the party to bend to his will and vision.  But what if it…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Barack Obama's second victory showed Republicans that the nation is changing, and that's led to an agonizing reappraisal.

The GOP and the Lessons of Last Year's Election

Barack Obama's second victory showed Republicans that the nation is changing, and that's led to an agonizing reappraisal.

from To the Point

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Think about "Parasite" as a home-invasion story unlike any other.

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66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

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Erik Patterson’s play “Handjob” does indeed include a handjob. So if you’re the kind of person who might be offended by that or by male frontal nudity then this play might, oddly, be…

from Opening the Curtain

What’s the difference between a dramatic story and a play? That’s the question that nervously filled my mind with the first words of “How the light gets in” at Boston Court.

from Opening the Curtain

Today, on All The President’s Jawyers...

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Google says its translation service can't replace human translators, but U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services tell officers it's the most efficient tool to vet refugees.

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Twenty-five years after ‘Clerks,’ Kevin Smith is shook. Despite his insistence that he's behind the times, he's always found ways to get his movies made.

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For months, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi resisted the mounting calls from her caucus to start impeachment proceedings.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand