Timothy Garton Ash

Oxford University

Guest

Historian at Oxford University and Stanford University, political writer and columnist for the Guardian

Timothy Garton Ash on KCRW

Government workers are returning. The United States will continue to pay its bills. The President says there are no winners and that all Americans lost.

Budget Crisis Fallout: What's the Damage?

Government workers are returning. The United States will continue to pay its bills. The President says there are no winners and that all Americans lost.

from To the Point

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Despite mounting evidence, Republicans in the House and the Senate are defending President Trump or keeping their heads down. Veteran GOP conservatives accuse them of sacrificing morality for short-term political gain. Meantime the Trump Administration calls the impeachment inquiry “unconstitutional,” while legal scholars point out that it’s part of Article II. And how did Ukraine, an obscure former Soviet republic, become so important? Money.

from To the Point

This week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a resolution officially recognizing the Armenian Genocide. For the diaspora, the decision is both long-overdue and bittersweet.

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If what you describe is a quid pro quo, is it a quid pro quo?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Republicans have been demanding a vote to open the impeachment inquiry. They may get one Thursday.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

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Was Gordon Sondland lying in his testimony, or was he just not prepared?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Fire season now lasts all year long in Southern California, and residents of Topanga Canyon have set an example for how to get ready. Volunteers are on the alert to help their neighbors, save their homes and protect their animals, or to evacuate.

from To the Point

Let’s talk about this letter from the White House, calling the “impeachment inquiry” illegitimate.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program faces a big test before the Supreme Court on Tuesday.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand