Tonya Lewis Lee

director

Tonya Lewis Lee on KCRW

“Aftershock” tells the story of two Black women who died from childbirth-related complications. Both deaths could have been prevented if medical staff listened and acted.

More pregnant Black women are dying, ‘Aftershock’ shares partners’ stories

“Aftershock” tells the story of two Black women who died from childbirth-related complications. Both deaths could have been prevented if medical staff listened and acted.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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