Trevor Aaronson

Florida Center for Investigative Reporting

Guest

Trevor Aaronson is the executive director of the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and a contributing writer at First Look Media’s The Intercept. He is also author of The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI’s Manufactured War on Terrorism.

He co-founded the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting, which has won national and regional journalism awards under his leadership. Aaronson reported and produced a one-hour documentary for Al Jazeera Media Network, “Informants,” about the FBI’s counterterrorism program.

Aaronson was a 2010-11 fellow at the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, Aaronson was an investigative reporter and editor for The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, where his stories ranged from local government investigations to reporting in Asia, Africa and South America. He was also formerly a staff writer for Miami New Times and New Times Broward-Palm Beach.

A two-time finalist for the Livingston Awards, Aaronson has won more than two dozen national and regional awards, including the Molly National Journalism Prize, the international Data Journalism Award and the John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award.

Aaronson has been featured on CBS This Morning, NPR’s All Things Considered, MSNBC, This American Life, C-SPAN’s Washington Journal, WNYC’s On the Media and The Leonard Lopate Show, among others.

Trevor Aaronson on KCRW

On Monday, the FBI caught an army veteran who was allegedly planning to detonate a bomb at a right wing rally in Long Beach.

FBI foils a Reseda man’s plot to detonate a bomb in Long Beach

On Monday, the FBI caught an army veteran who was allegedly planning to detonate a bomb at a right wing rally in Long Beach.

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Stopping terrorism has become one of the most important missions for law enforcement these days.

What Happens to FBI Informants When They Aren’t Needed Anymore?

Stopping terrorism has become one of the most important missions for law enforcement these days.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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