Warren Strobel

Reuters

Guest

Warren Strobel is Diplomatic Editor for Reuters. He is a former foreign affairs correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers

Warren Strobel on KCRW

It's reported that intelligence agents are withholding information from the Chief Executive out of fear that it could be leaked or compromised.

Another wedge between the President and intelligence community

It's reported that intelligence agents are withholding information from the Chief Executive out of fear that it could be leaked or compromised.

from To the Point

For months, State Department officials and a few members of Congress have warned that America's at risk of violating international law.

The United States in another Middle-East civil war

For months, State Department officials and a few members of Congress have warned that America's at risk of violating international law.

from To the Point

As the US prepares to send 30,000 or more troops to Afghanistan, Iraq has seen a dramatic decrease in violence.  But politics is another matter.

Iraq: That 'Other' War

As the US prepares to send 30,000 or more troops to Afghanistan, Iraq has seen a dramatic decrease in violence.  But politics is another matter.

from Which Way, L.A.?

More from KCRW

A cartoon on the cover of the Economist says it all: leaders of the world’s two foremost democracies are scrambling to hold on. President Trump is faced with the possibility of impeachment. In the interests of Brexit, Boris Johnson is accused of lying to the Queen and defying Parliament. In both countries, voters are losing trust not just in their elected leaders but in their governments. The UK and the US aren’t alone, as the ideals of western democracy are being challenged by demagogues in other parts of the world.

from To the Point

These are some interesting texts.

from Left, Right & Center

In a Dallas courtroom on Wednesday, a former police officer was convicted of murder for killing her African American neighbor, then she got a hug from the victim’s brother and the…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

... there's a lot to discuss after last night's Democratic presidential debate.

from Left, Right & Center

Election officials in LA County want to make voting easier, more accessible, and more secure.

from KCRW Features

Gov. Gavin Newsom has approved more than 800 bills.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The House of Representatives appears to be moving toward impeachment of President Trump.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Malcolm Gladwell’s latest book, “Talking to Strangers,” is out, while he’s hosting the podcast, “Revisionist History.”

from To the Point

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point