Whitney Henry-Lester

Independent Producer

Whitney Henry-Lester loves documentaries, places, and food. She grew up in New York's Catskill Mountains, and her work has taken her to Chicago with the Third Coast Audio Festival and CHIRP Radio, to Ecuador with Radio Intag, to Brooklyn with Heritage Radio Network, and across the country in an Airstream trailer with StoryCorps. She also has fun with film, having served as an assistant editor on the Academy Award Nominated Short Doc, Rehearsing A Dream, and as an associate producer on the independent film, A Girl and A Gun.


Whitney Henry-Lester on KCRW

Presenting the winners of the second annual KCRW 24 Hour Radio Race!

The 24 Hour Radio Race 2014

Presenting the winners of the second annual KCRW 24 Hour Radio Race!

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