Zachary Karabell

President, River Twice Research

Guest

President of River Twice Research; author of Sustainable Excellence: The Future of Business in a Fast-Changing World and Superfusion: How China and America Became One Economy and Why the World's Prosperity Depends on It

Zachary Karabell on KCRW

After a weekend of silence, President  Obama addressed the S&P downgrade  and the US economy this afternoon from a White House dining room.

The S&P Downgrade: Economics and Politics

After a weekend of silence, President Obama addressed the S&P downgrade and the US economy this afternoon from a White House dining room.

from Which Way, L.A.?

Fingers of blame are being pointed in every direction as Wall Street and world financial markets react to  history's first downgrade  of America's credit rating.

The S&P Downgrade: Economics and Politics

Fingers of blame are being pointed in every direction as Wall Street and world financial markets react to history's first downgrade of America's credit rating.

from To the Point

In this year's political campaigns, Democrats and Republicans are accusing each other of helping to cause America's economic decline. In the process, both parties are demonizing China.

China: Before and After Election Day

In this year's political campaigns, Democrats and Republicans are accusing each other of helping to cause America's economic decline. In the process, both parties are demonizing China.

from Which Way, L.A.?

More from KCRW

Will mass shootings become part of America’s background noise?   That’s an ugly prospect raised by the deaths of 34 people this week in Texas, Ohio and California.

from To the Point

In Redding, California, firefighters are still battling the large Mountain Fire that broke out late Thursday morning.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Absolute immunity, executive privilege, crony privilege?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

“We can’t recycle our way out of this crisis.” That’s according to California’s Democratic State Senator Ben Allen-- just one of many politicians around the country proposing to ban all straws, bags and other single-use plastics. At the overwhelmed Recycling Center in Burbank, California, Kreigh Hample says, “Our packaging has gone up exponentially in just the last few decades… it’s a sad story in the way we eat, the way we dispose of things and the way that we’re living.” A throwaway culture may be convenient, but the costs include cleaning it up with taxpayer money--not to mention worldwide pollution. China now requires recycled products so pure that the bottom’s gone out of the market, but the plastics industry is bigger than ever. Former EPA official Judith Judith Enck says half the world’s plastics have been produced in the past 13 years. One new process has developed from coal fracking, and development is being encouraged by President Trump with support from the fossil fuel industry. But just 9% of the plastic produced is getting recycled. Some goes to landfills, but the rest turns into worldwide pollution. Images of plastic waste floating by the acre in the Pacific Ocean are all too familiar; microplastics are turning up from the depths of the seas to the remotest parts of the Arctic. In Texas and other states, it’s illegal to ban plastic products. But, in Sacramento, Allen says it’s time to hold the plastics industry accountable. California is big enough to influence the nation’s economy, so his efforts are being scrutinized by politicians and advocates around the country.

from To the Point

The annual Iowa State Fair is known as the unofficial start to campaign season.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Since March some 387 Boeing 737 Max jets have been grounded by regulators and airlines with no end in sight. Boeing profits have tanked. Last month the company recorded its biggest ever quarterly loss and deliveries are at their lowest since 2012. Boeing says it expects the plane to return to service by the end of this year, as it continues to focus on the plane’s software system, thought to be the cause of both plane crashes. Boeing’s crisis highlights a problem beyond flight safety. The aircraft manufacturer chose to prioritize big spending on CEO compensation and stock buybacks rather than reinvest profits on its employees, infrastructure and R and D. Last year alone, Boeing’s chief executive Dennis Muilenburg took home $30 in compensation and gains from options. Buybacks over investment; the financial strategy that’s great for shareholders but may well have cost Boeing the public’s trust.

from To the Point

Students are cutting class, and workers are striking worldwide.   At the UN, governments will be held accountable for promises made in the Paris Accords.

from To the Point

Last week's mass shooting in El Paso has been particularly painful for Angelenos, because so many have close ties to that city.

from Greater LA

P eople like Becky Dennison are working to address to one  of America’s most urgent crises with a straightforward approach.

from Scheer Intelligence