Broken Back, Unbroken Spirit

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The best time to enjoy – and even marvel – at the gigantic sculpture by Mark di Suvero on Venice Beach is sunset. That’s when his 60-foot-tall steel work, titled Declaration, looks the most imposing. It’s been there since 2001, in honor of the nonprofit Venice Family Clinic. The artist, and LA Louver gallery, which represents him, has loaned this work for almost two decades to the city without a fee. Unfortunately, the city was unable to find donors to help it acquire the piece, and so this Summer the sculpture will be removed and sent back to di Suvero’s studio in Northern California.

Installation photography, Mark di Suvero: Painting and Sculpture. LA Louver. Image courtesy LA Louver.

But, the good news is that right now LA Louver has a mini-retrospective showing the diversity and strength of his work over the last two decades. The steel sculptures selected are all of small scale, but each of them has a big story to tell. And a big surprise, as well… Take a look at the video of one of these sculptures, and you will be awestruck watching this super-macho, aggressive metal form moving in a most elegant dance. It’s as if male and female counterparts, in perfect balance, perform for your pleasure.

 Installation photography, Mark di Suvero: Painting and Sculpture. LA Louver. Image courtesy LA Louver.

One appreciates the work even more with the understanding that di Suvero, now 85 years old, continues to work like nothing happened to him. Actually, most of his life, he had to deal with a dramatic back injury that left doctors doubtful he’d ever walk again. Be sure that you ask the gallery assistant permission to spin each of his sculptures, which will make you dizzy with delight, watching it dance.

 Installation shot, Frank Stella: Selections from the Permanent Collection. LACMA. Photo by Edward Goldman.

And, talking about a mini-retrospective… LACMA just opened an exhibition of 10 works by Frank Stella – all of them, from the museum’s permanent collection. Some of these works haven’t been on display in over 30 years.

 Installation shot, Frank Stella: Selections from the Permanent Collection. LACMA. Photo by Edward Goldman.

The exhibition reveals the amazing range of Frank Stella’s work, from his groundbreaking “black” paintings from the late 50s to his most recent monumental wall sculptures exploding into our space, making you take a cautious step back. At 82 years old, Stella doesn’t stop for a second…


L: Ron Bottitta C: Diana Cignoni R: Paul Norwood, the cast of “Faith Healer” at Odyssey Theatre Ensemble. Photos courtesy OTE.

And now, my smart and adventurous listeners, I want to tell you about two theatre productions I saw over the weekend that I think you will find intriguing. At Odyssey Theatre, I saw the play by Irish playwright Brian Friel (1929-2015), “Faith Healer,” in which three characters, one after another, tell the same story from three different perspectives. Directed by Ron Sossi, all three actors – Ron Bottitta, Diana Cignoni, and Paul Norwood – deliver their monologues with such passion and eloquence, you never want them to stop.

L to R: Brian Wallace, Michael Trevino, and Lola Kelly, cast members of “Crime and Punishment” at the Edgemar Center for the Arts Mainstage. Photo courtesy Working Barn Productions.

And of course, I was not able to resist the temptation to see the adaptation of Dostoyevsky’s famous novel, “Crime and Punishment” at Edgemar Center for the Arts. The long novel about Raskolnikov killing an old lady, both of them neighbors in the shady streets of St. Petersburg, is compressed into a 90-minute production with three actors playing multiple roles. What made me particularly glued to the stage was the fact that I was born in the very neighborhood where Dostoyevky’s story takes place.

Credits

Host:
Edward Goldman

Producer:
Kathleen Yore